Photo submitted Pictured is the Bibb-Lewis Cemetery located between Auburn and Russellville out in a field. Adam Scales, President of the Col. Benjamin Logan Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution recently cleaned up the cemetery which has been overgrown and crumbling for years.

Photo submitted

Pictured is the Bibb-Lewis Cemetery located between Auburn and Russellville out in a field. Adam Scales, President of the Col. Benjamin Logan Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution recently cleaned up the cemetery which has been overgrown and crumbling for years.

Two prominent figures who found their homes in Logan County and final resting places in a field between Auburn and Russellville will be memorialized Saturday, Oct. 5th at 10 a.m. by members of the Colonel Benjamin Logan Chapter Sons of the American Revolution.

Both Major Richard Bibb and Captain John Lewis fought during the Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Bibb was born in 1752 in Virginia. From 1783 to 1787 he was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates. He was also a Captain of the Virginia Militia for his district. When the Revolution came, Bibb was a college student studying the Episcopal ministry.

After the war, Bibb came to Lexington in 1798, moving the next year to Logan County where he built Bibb's Chapel. He later erected the Bibb House for his wife at 183 W. Eighth Street, Russellville which is now a museum.

Major Bibb was reputed as the wealthiest man in Western Kentucky. He was the owner of a large number of slaves, furnishing them with the means for acquiring farms and homes of their own. In 1829, he freed 29 of his slaves and returned them to Liberia where they were given homes in their native continent. He provided for the liberation of his remaining slaves in his will.

Colonel John Bibb, his son, was the administrator who carried out the will of his father to the letter. John went on to develop Bibb lettuce, while another one of his sons, George, became Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, a U.S. Senator, and a member of President Andrew Tyler's cabinet.

Lewis, who is buried a few stones down from Bibb, was born in 1747, also in Virginia, the oldest child of Colonel Fielding Lewis and his first wife Catherine Washington. Catherine died when John was two and a half years old. His father remarried the first cousin of his deceased wife, Betty Washington, 16-year-old daughter of the widowed Mary Ball Washington and only sister of the then 18-year-old George Washington, later to be General and first president of the United States.

As the oldest son and heir of a prominent and wealthy man, young John was sent to England for part of his education and attended lectures at Oxford University. He returned to Virginia in his 22nd year and was associated in the business of merchandising, shipping, real estate, and farming.

Colonel Fielding was actively engaged in the manufacturing of gunpowder and at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, put his whole fortune into his business in an effort to supply the Virginia troops. John was associated with him in this work and ranked as Captain in the Virginia Militia in 1780. Fielding, who was made Brigadier General died in December 1781 and lies buried under the steps of St. George's Episcopal Church in Fredericksburg, Va. of which he was a Vestryman and early leader. John assumed his father's responsibilities in the gunpowder works.

John had a serious illness in 1785, mentioned in George Washington's diary and spent eight weeks in Mt. Vernon before he was able to return to Fredericksburg. President Washington records that he had tea at Mr. John Lewis' in Fredricksburg on April 28, 1787.

When General Washington died in 1799, his principal executor was Lawrence Lewis, John's half brother. Lawrence employed his nephew Gabriel (John's son), a surveyor to survey Kentucky lands belonging to the General's estate. Gabriel was soon joined by his bother, Warner. Both settled in Logan County.

Gabriel married Mary Bibb, daughter of Major Richard Bibb, thus the relation between the two whose families are buried in the same cemetery in Logan County.

Captain Lewis and his daughter Mary Ann moved to Warren County in 1811 where he had bought land on military warrants. Unfortunately, John was left landless when the Kentucky Courts upheld the possession of squatters on his property. He moved to the home of his sons in Logan County and remained there for the rest of his days at Elmwood until his death in 1825.

Logan County is rich in history and educating the public on the importance of knowing this history is one of the missions of the Colonel Benjamin Logan Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution.

At the Grave Marking Ceremony to be held Saturday, Oct. 5 at 2005 Echo Valley Road, Auburn, members of the SAR will feature a biographical, musical, floral, and flag tribute along with a Color Guard, Flintlock and cannon salute. Everyone is welcome to attend the ceremony. You are asked to bring a lawn chair. The gravel road to the event is long and the cemetery is in an open field. There will be parking instructions as well as shuttle service.