Photo submitted Pictured with the statue at the unveiling in Washington D.C. from left to right are Joe Gran Clark, Michael Morrow, Marvinia Neblett, and Charles Neblett.

Photo submitted

Pictured with the statue at the unveiling in Washington D.C. from left to right are Joe Gran Clark, Michael Morrow, Marvinia Neblett, and Charles Neblett.

Staff report

The Russellville Rotary Club has announced that it will be to partnering with Historic Russellville, Inc. in preparing a park area in Russellville for the Alice Allison Dunnigan Statue through the Rotary District Grant program.

Work on the park on East 6th Street will begin in early 2019, in anticipation of the statue's arrival in August of 2019. The statue is scheduled to be unveiled in Russellville as part of the annual 8th of August Emancipation Celebration.

"This is the first time that our club has applied for a district grant, and we are so excited that the timing of this project allowed us to be involved in this way," said Russellville Rotary Club president Elizabeth Teel. "Historic Russellville's goal to promote awareness of Russellville native, Alice Dunnigan, is so important because the example of her life is one that all Logan Countians need to be aware of. The Rotary Club hopes that by participating in creating this area where the statue will be permanently located, we will aid in educating our community about civil rights and people like Dunnigan so that her efforts will never be forgotten in her hometown."

The site will be a place where community members can learn about this iconic Russellville native, her fight against race and gender discrimination and her commitment to living a life of service above self.

Although it has been over 35 years since her death, Dunnigan continues to bring national attention to the small town of Russellville.

Dunnigan was born in Russellville on April 27, 1906. Despite being an African-American female at the turn of the 20th century, she received an education and moved to Washington, D.C. to pursue a career as a journalist. Throughout her career, she was an outspoken Civil Rights advocate while serving as a chief of the Washington Bureau of the Associated Negro Press, a member of the Senate and House of Representative's press galleries and a White House correspondent.

To honor Dunnigan and her contributions, Historic Russellville, Inc., which works to preserve African-American history and educate the public about Civil Rights issues, partnered with Kentucky sculptor Amanda Matthews to create a statue. The work was recently unveiled in Washington, D.C. at Newseum. The statue will then be on display at the University of Kentucky and the Truman Presidential Library before it is brought to its permanent home in Russellville.