Process begins for applying for a quota license in Adairville and Auburn


By Chris Cooper - ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com



Elizabeth Goss Kuhn, Executive Director for the Office of Communications and Public Outreach for the state of Kentucky, weighs in on the process for applying for a quota license when a territory votes to become wet.


With the recent passing in Adairville and Auburn the ability to sell alcoholic beverages within these city’s limits, steps will now be followed set forth by the Kentucky Alcohol Beverage Control. According to Elizabeth Goss Kuhn, Executive Director for the Office of Communications and Public Outreach for the state of Kentucky, there is a process for applying for a quota license when a territory votes to become wet.

“A territory officially becomes wet 60 days after the election is certified. During this time, the local government writes and approves ordinances pertaining to alcohol sales and decides who will be in charge of licenses,” said Kuhn. “During the 60 day period, applicants can review the requirements for licensing on the state ABC website and begin working on licensing applications. They cannot submit applications during this time.”

The state ABC will then run an advertisement in the local newspaper announcing what types of licenses and how many are available in the area. License applicants will then need to run notification advertisements in the local newspaper (within 30 days of the state ABC’s advertisement). Then, applicants can submit their application concurrently to local officials and the state.

Once an applicant runs an ad in the newspaper, there is a 30 day “protest period” during which time individuals may submit letters to the state ABC detailing why an applicant should not get a license. Also, during this time, the Distilled Spirits Administrator will send out a letter to applicants requesting an economic impact statement. The administrator looks at each community individually when making decisions and considers factors including economic impact, location, adequate police protection, transportation and traffic issues, and public sentiment.

A local option election was held in the cities of Adairville and Auburn Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. The only thing that appeared on the ballot was the decision allow the sale of alcohol in the city limits of both cities. Only residents that live within the city limits of Adairville and Auburn were allowed to vote. Total yes votes for Adairville were 108 with 34 no. Total yes votes for Auburn fell at 166 with 83 no.

Mayors in both cities agreed the election came with mixed emotions by many in their communities. But both also agreed the decision to drink is a personal one, and if people are going to purchase alcohol anyway, why shouldn’t the cities receive the revenue from it.

Elizabeth Goss Kuhn, Executive Director for the Office of Communications and Public Outreach for the state of Kentucky, weighs in on the process for applying for a quota license when a territory votes to become wet.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/web1_Alcohol-sales-960×540.jpgElizabeth Goss Kuhn, Executive Director for the Office of Communications and Public Outreach for the state of Kentucky, weighs in on the process for applying for a quota license when a territory votes to become wet.

By Chris Cooper

ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

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