Getting prescription drugs out of the hands of our teens


KSP to hold Drug Take Back event Oct. 22

By Chris Cooper - ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com



The Kentucky State Police will be partnering with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) on Oct. 22, 2016, in a collaborative effort to remove potentially dangerous controlled substances from home medicine cabinets.

Collection activities will take place from 10 a.m. through 2 p.m. in every KSP Post area across the state. The location for this area will be at KSP Post 3, 3119 Nashville Road, in Bowling Green.

Lt. Michael Webb, spokesperson for KSP, advised that the semi-annual program is designed to be easy for citizens and offered the following tips for those interested in participating:

Participants may dispose of medication in its original container or by removing the medication from its container and disposing of it directly into the disposal box located at the drop off location.

All solid dosage pharmaceutical products in consumer containers will be accepted.

Intravenous solutions, injectibles and syringes will not be accepted due to potential hazard posed by blood-borne pathogens.

Illicit substances such as marijuana or methamphetamine are not a part of this initiative and should not be placed in collection containers.

Webb advised that KSP has participated in the DEA ‘Take Back’ program since its inception in 2010 and since that time has collected nearly 10,000 pounds of prescription medication.

Logan County’s drug task force has partnered in Take Back program every year. There are containers set up at both the Logan County Sheriff’s Department and the Russellville Police Department at all times for people to dispose of their prescription drugs.

In 2016, the South Central Kentucky Task Force collected over 30 pounds of outdated or unused prescription drugs in the the Logan and Simpson County areas. The prescription drugs were turned over to the DEA for disposal. In the previous nine Take Back events nationwide from 2010-2014, 4,823,251 pounds, or 2,411 tons of drugs were collected.

“Prescription drug abuse is a huge problem and this is a great opportunity for folks around the country to help reduce the threat,” said DEA Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg. “Please clean out your medicine cabinet and make your home safe from drug theft and abuse.”

According to the DEA, most people take prescription medications responsibly, an estimated 52 million people have used prescription drugs for non-medical reasons at least once in their lifetime. Prescription medication, such as those used to treat pain, attention deficit disorders, and anxiety, are being abused at a rate second only to marijuana among illicit drug users.

Despite recent reductions in several areas of teen drug use, teens are continuing to use prescription and over-the-counter medications to get high. It’s a serious problem that affects all of us. Many parents don’t know enough about this problem, and many teens don’t understand the dangers of using the medications to get high.

Recent drug surveys also provide evidence that the problem of intentional medicine abuse has grown. Six of the top ten drugs abused by 12th graders are prescription and over-the-counter medications. After marijuana, prescription and over-the-counter medications account for most of the top illicit drugs abused by 12th graders in the past year.

Parents and grandparents can help in this fight to end prescription drug abuse by emptying their medicine cabinets of unused prescription medication and disposing it at a law enforcement agency near them.

For more information about the ‘Take Back’ program, contact KSP at 502-782-1780 or visit the DEA website at http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/

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KSP to hold Drug Take Back event Oct. 22

By Chris Cooper

ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

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