5th annual Federal Grove Maple Syrup Festival


By Chris Cooper - ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com



Photo submitted Federal Grove Bed & Breakfast


Photo submitted Pure maple syrup flows from Federal Grove.


Photo submitted Federal Grove’s Maple Sugar Works uses an evaporation system to make 100 percent pure maple syrup.


Photo submitted Trees are tapped and the sap collected from sugar maple, red maple or black maple trees.


This weekend is the 5th Annual Federal Grove Maple Syrup Festival (March 4-5), and it will be a delicious combination of local sweetness both for the palate and the company.

Federal Grove is a unique and historical bed and breakfast nestled right outside the City of Auburn. It is also a restaurant and most recently a thriving Maple Sugar Works.

Federal Grove has always been known for hospitality dating all the way back to 1835 when travelers from Louisville or Nashville would stop over at Federal Grove for a short stay. Owners continue the rich tradition of the bed & breakfast offering four guest rooms to those wanting a tranquil getaway where they’ll feel right at home.

Federal Grove, by most accounts, are the southernmost maple syrup producer. Their maple sap begins to flow in Mid-January and continues with periods of freezing and thawing through early March. The maple sap collection leads to the arduous task of boiling the sap until it reaches the point of syrup. It takes 35-50 gallons of sap boiled down to produce one gallon of syrup.

Maple syrup is made from the sap of sugar maple, red maple or black maple trees. Trees are tapped and the sap collected is heated and boiled to evaporate the water content. The end result is maple syrup.

Federal Grove Maple Syrup is 100 percent pure Maple syrup, that is carefully filtered and bottled in a unique glass container. Owners guarantee you’ll find their southernmost maple syrup to be the best you’ve ever tasted.

At the festival this year, the public can view maple syrup production, including sap collection and the boiling/evaporation process, and sample the syrup at a pancake breakfast. The festival is free and open to the public. Local craft and food vendors will also be at the festival including Talotam Hollow brooms and baskets, Mama’s Soaps and Such, Eric’s Chainsaw Carvings and Shaving Horse Crafts.

“This is a great opportunity for folks to see how maple syrup is made,” said Lee Blythe, Owner, Federal Grove. “The festival is also a unique opportunity to buy other Kentucky-made products.”

Federal Grove Restaurant will be serving a pancake breakfast on Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Lunch menu is available from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and dinner menu available from 4-8 p.m. Tent vendor hours are Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free parking is available at Federal Grove, 475 East Main St., Auburn, Ky.

For more information about the festival, contact Lee Blythe at 270-542-6106 or visit www.federalgrove.com

Federal Grove History

In 1785, General Jonathan Clark (eldest brother to William Clark of the Lewis & Clark Expedition) was awarded 10,000 acres of land for his Revolutionary War service. The land grant had to be taken west of the Green River in Kentucky. His first stop was here at Federal Grove where his daughter, Eleanor and son-in-law, Benjamin Temple would in 1805 establish Federal Grove, a 1,700 acre plantation. At the peak of Federal Grove in 1840, the farm had grown to over 2,000 acres, had 26 slaves and a sizable wheat, corn, and livestock operation. At the death of Mr. Temple, Eleanor left Federal Grove and later sold the property to Captain Harrison Wood.

Captain Wood re-named the settlement Woodville and established a general store, blacksmith shop and one room schoolhouse on the site of the current Federal Grove in the late 1850’s. As the Civil War unfolded, it is said that Captain Wood fled for Texas in fear of his life. Although there were never any battles near Federal Grove, it was a major thoroughfare for traveling soldiers of both Union and Confederate forces. As they traveled they simply took anything they needed along the way.

In 1871 a young gentleman farmer by the name of James Monroe Hall purchased Federal Grove and the property remained in the Hall family until 1991 when Wayne and Terry Blythe purchased the home and 13 acres . The property was restored and later in 1992 established as a B&B and restaurant.

Photo submitted Federal Grove Bed & Breakfast
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_fedgrvFront2.jpgPhoto submitted Federal Grove Bed & Breakfast

Photo submitted Pure maple syrup flows from Federal Grove.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_31975_118999241475226_7381571_n.jpgPhoto submitted Pure maple syrup flows from Federal Grove.

Photo submitted Federal Grove’s Maple Sugar Works uses an evaporation system to make 100 percent pure maple syrup.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_12799424_10208358112413461_180350845541343633_n.jpgPhoto submitted Federal Grove’s Maple Sugar Works uses an evaporation system to make 100 percent pure maple syrup.

Photo submitted Trees are tapped and the sap collected from sugar maple, red maple or black maple trees.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_548665_5001523247388_1067867786_n1.jpgPhoto submitted Trees are tapped and the sap collected from sugar maple, red maple or black maple trees.

By Chris Cooper

ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

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