Adairville students get a taste of culture


Photos submitted Seventh graders Ryleigh and Katelyn make a multi-media mosaic.


At the Parthenon, Chase and Chandler rub the nose of the lion for good luck.


Adairville seventh grade students have a new appreciation for the old adage, “It’s all Greek to me.” After a nine-week interdisciplinary study of ancient Greek architecture, government, history, literature, and culture, their studies were brought to life with a field trip to the Parthenon in Nashville, Tenn.

Students were amazed by the 48 feet tall statue of Athena and her enormous shield and sword. They recognized many of the mythological stories they had read in class portrayed in the pediments of the building.

After the Parthenon tour, students experienced authentic Grecian cuisine at Santorini’s Greek Restaurant in downtown Nashville. Each student received a sampler platter of lamb, pita bread, falafel, humus, and Mediterranean rice and chicken. The meal was topped off with homemade baklava for dessert. One student named Lily said, “The food was strange-looking at first, but once I got the nerve to try it, I loved it!”

The field trip became even more interactive with a visit to the Frist Center of Fine Art. Students had fun at the award-winning Martin ArtQuest Gallery where they explored 30 hands-on stations. Students created prints and collages, 3D sketches and self-portraits. “Creating the digital animations was my favorite part,” a young lady named Morgan said. “Now I know how they do it in the movies.”

Finally, students were fortunate enough to view two rare exhibits in the Frist’s main gallery: Michaelangelo’s Sacred and Profane Masterpiece Drawings and an Islamic art exhibit from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston called Ink, Silk and Gold. Students enjoyed two other very colorful and eccentric exhibits: one about rainbows and the other about phantoms. Many were surprised by the artwork made from recycled materials; others were enthralled with the video and audio productions. “I’d never been to a museum before,” a young man named Kaleb said. “I didn’t realize that some artwork can be made of everyday stuff I have at my house.”

According to research conducted by the University of Arkansas, students who attend field trips centered around their classroom content demonstrate stronger abilities to think critically and to appreciate what life was like for people who lived in a different time and place. “These trips open up the broader world for rural students,” said reading teacher Lori Bouldin. “We are hoping these experiences grow our students into open-minded adults who appreciate history, art, and cultural diversity.” Thanks to Adairville School for making this trip possible.

7th graders Ryleigh and Katelyn At the Parthenon, Chase and

make a multi-media mosaic. Chandler rub the nose of the lion

for good luck.

Paige and Praiden try authentic Greek

food at Santorini’s in Nashville.

Photos submitted Seventh graders Ryleigh and Katelyn make a multi-media mosaic.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Adairville1.jpgPhotos submitted Seventh graders Ryleigh and Katelyn make a multi-media mosaic.

At the Parthenon, Chase and Chandler rub the nose of the lion for good luck.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Adairville2.jpgAt the Parthenon, Chase and Chandler rub the nose of the lion for good luck.

http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Adairville3.jpg
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