Kentucky 4‐H foundation distributes money statewide


Kentucky 4-H councils to receive funds from “Ag Tag” donations

The Kentucky 4‐H Foundation is excited to announce the results from the 2015 Ag Tag Donations that will go to assist Kentucky 4‐H programs and counties across the Commonwealth. Back in March, Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer, 4‐H and FFA asked farmers across the Commonwealth to step‐up and make the “Ag Tag” donation.

The 4‐H share for fiscal year ending June 30, 2015 was $180,119.05. These funds benefit all levels of Kentucky 4‐H. The 4‐H share is split between the county where the funds originated and the Kentucky 4‐H Foundation. That means half of the donation stays in the county, funding local 4‐H programs and activities for the youth in the community. The Foundation’s share is used to support state level programs that many 4‐H members participate in, ensuring that 4‐H remains a vital center of excellence in the Commonwealth.

All 120 counties in Kentucky have 4‐H programs, and all counties will receive a portion of the support from the “Ag Tag” program. Next week, the Kentucky 4‐H Foundation will disburse $89,186.21 to the County 4‐H Councils for the 2015 Ag Tag Donation. Through the support of the agriculture community 80 counties increased their donations, 18 counties had a $1,000 or more increase in donations, and 23 counties had a 50% or higher donation rate to tags sold and renewed over fiscal year 2014.

“The voluntary donations from the “Ag Tag” program will help Kentucky 4‐H give our young people around the Commonwealth opportunities that develop leadership, citizenship, and life skills,” said Agriculture Commissioner James Comer. “It has been an honor to have worked with our County Clerks, 4‐H, FFA, and others to grow this program during these past four years.”

“Under Commissioner Comer’s leadership the “Ag Tag” program has raised over $1.8 million in four years for 4‐H, FFA, and the Kentucky Proud Program,” said Keith Rogers, executive director, Kentucky 4‐H Foundation. “Kentucky 4‐H has received during that period,

$632,002.96; this has made a tremendous impact on 4‐H programs across the Commonwealth.”

Below are the top 5 counties in total donations for the fiscal year 2014‐2015:

1. Warren $26,427.33

2. Hardin $17,110.00

3. Logan $16,860.00

4. Daviess $15,380.00

5. Fayette $14,890.00

“The Foundation is very appreciative of Commissioner Comer’s leadership in developing the Ag

Tag Program and the support he has provided to our 4‐H members,” said Pamela R. Larson, Chairperson, Kentucky 4‐H Foundation. “We also want to say thank you to all those who donated and helped to promote the Ag Tag program.”

Since 2012, Kentucky farmers had the option to make a $10.00 voluntary donation when they purchased or renewed their license plate. The voluntary donations go to the Agricultural Program Trust Fund. During Commissioner Comer’s term in office, he has equally divided the amount raised among 4‐H, FFA and Kentucky Proud. As an individual that makes the voluntary donation for your farm vehicle, you help 4‐H grow strong leaders for tomorrow, advance agricultural education in Kentucky and promote Kentucky farm products.

For a more detailed summary of Kentucky’s “Ag Tag” program and to find out more information about how your county did please visit our website at www.kentucky4hfoundation.org.

###

About Kentucky 4‐H Foundation: The Kentucky 4‐H Foundation exists to lead fund development for Kentucky 4‐H Youth Development Program and advance support by alumni and other stakeholders to ensure 4‐H remains a vital center of excellence in the

Commonwealth. The Kentucky 4‐H Foundation raises funds to support Kentucky 4‐H programs that provide leadership development, life skills, citizenship, and positive experiences and opportunities. Kentucky ranks in the top 10 of several 4‐H enrollment categories nationwide, with 256,345 youth from the state or 32% of the K‐12th grade population participate in 4‐H.

Kentucky 4-H councils to receive funds from “Ag Tag” donations
comments powered by Disqus