All posts by englewoodindependent

Kentucky’s jobless rate drops to 5.3 percent in April

First Posted: 2:24 pm - May 30th, 2016

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Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate for April 2016 dropped to 5.3 percent from a revised 5.6 percent in March 2016, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet.

The preliminary April 2016 jobless rate was identical to the rate recorded for the state in April 2015.

The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for April 2016 was 5 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Labor force statistics, including the unemployment rate, are based on estimates from the Current Population Survey of households. It is designed to measure trends rather than to count the actual number of people working. It includes jobs in agriculture and those classified as self-employed.

In April 2016, Kentucky’s civilian labor force was 1,982,338, an increase of 268 individuals compared to the previous month. Employment was up by 6,405, and the number of unemployed decreased by 6,137.

“After three months of lackluster performance the labor force numbers are back on track. The low unemployment rate is not the only bright spot,” said economist Manoj Shanker of the OET. “The picture has brightened further with an uptick in labor force participation rates, and a robust increase in year-over-year employment.”

In a separate federal survey of business establishments that excludes jobs in agriculture and people who are self-employed, Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm employment decreased by 4,000 jobs in April 2016 from the month before but rose by 34,900 positions since April 2015.

“Unemployment rate statistics and the jobs data come from two independent surveys. Over the long run they tell the same story,” said Shanker. “But on a month-to-month basis the statistics sometimes deviate just because of the timing of the surveys. When that happens it is usually more appropriate to look at the over-the-year change.”

Nonfarm data is provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Employment Statistics program. According to this survey, four of Kentucky’s 11 major nonfarm North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) job sectors registered gains in employment, while six declined and one remained the same.

The government sector, which includes public education, public administration agencies and state-owned hospitals, gained 1,900 jobs in April 2016. The sector posted a drop of 3,800 jobs compared to April 2015.

“The growth in state government is primarily from state government educational services,” said Shanker. “Around one-sixth of Kentucky’s nonfarm employment is in government, half of these jobs are in local government, around 30 percent in state government, and the rest in federal.”

The state’s professional and business services grew by 1,500 positions in April 2016 from a month ago. Year-over-year, there was a substantial gain of 8,800 jobs. This category includes establishments engaged in services that support the day-to-day activities of other organizations, including temporary employment services and payroll processing.

The educational and health services sector added by 900 positions in April 2016, and there was a robust gain of 10,700 jobs or more than 4 percent from a year ago.

“Health care jobs account for 13 percent of all nonfarm employment in Kentucky and were up by 700 positions over the month, while educational services increased by 200 positions,” Shanker said.

The financial activities sector expanded by 500 jobs in April 2016 from a month ago. The sector has added 2,300 jobs since last April.

The information sector remained unchanged in April 2016. This segment has declined by 700 positions from a year ago. The industries in this sector include traditional publishing as well as software publishing; motion pictures and broadcasting; and telecommunications.

Employment in the mining and logging sector decreased by 200 positions in April 2016 from a month ago. The industry has declined by 2,700 positions from a year ago.

The leisure and hospitality sector fell by 1,000 jobs in April 2016 from a month ago. Since April last year, the sector has added 2,700 jobs. This sector includes arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services.

Employment in the other services sector, which includes repairs and maintenance, personal care services, and religious organizations, dropped by 1,000 positions in April 2016 from a month ago. This sector has decreased by 1,000 jobs from a year ago.

Kentucky’s manufacturing sector contracted by 1,100 jobs in April 2016 compared to the previous month. Since April 2015, employment in manufacturing has increased by 6,600 or nearly 3 percent. Over the year, the durable goods subsector added 8,700 jobs, while nondurable goods industries lost 2,100 jobs.

“In spite of the ‘correction’ in April—which is economist-speak for a temporary decline—employment in durable goods industries, especially machinery and motor vehicle manufacturing, is on an upswing,” said Shanker.

The construction sector fell by 2,300 jobs in April 2016 from a month ago. Since April 2015, construction jobs have been down by 800 positions.

Kentucky’s trade, transportation, and utilities sector contracted by 3,200 jobs in April 2016 from a month ago. This is the largest sector in Kentucky with more than 400,000 jobs accounting for one-fifth of all nonfarm employment. Since April 2015, this sector has expanded substantially with a gain of 12,900 jobs. Retail trade lost 2,200 jobs over the previous month, but expanded by 9,800 jobs over the year.

Morrow, Whittinghill sign to play college ball

First Posted: 1:06 pm - May 30th, 2016

By OJ Stapleton - ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com



Logan County senior volleyball player Sierra Morrow signed with Kentucky Wesleyan.
Logan County basketball player Noah Whittinghill signed with Lindsey Wilson.
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Logan County High School recently had a pair of student athletes sign to play college sports.

Senior volleyball player Sierra Morrow signed to attend Kentucky Wesleyan next year. During her senior year, Morrow held the Lady Cougars go 29-9 overall, winning another District 13 championship along the way. Logan County was unfortunately upset in the first round of the Fourth Region Tournament by Greenwood, ending the season.

Morrow finished her senior season with 125 kills, 47 solo blocks, 72 total blocks and 57 aces.

Boys’ basketball player Noah Whittinghill signed with Lindsey Wilson College.

Whittinghill helped Logan County to a 10-14 overall record before losing to Russellville in the first round of the District 13 tournament.

Whittinghill led the Cougars in scoring with 15.6 points per game.He shot 49 percent from the field and 39 percent from 3-point range. Whittinghill also averaged 3.5 rebounds per game, which was second most on the team.

Logan County senior volleyball player Sierra Morrow signed with Kentucky Wesleyan.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_signing.jpgLogan County senior volleyball player Sierra Morrow signed with Kentucky Wesleyan.

Logan County basketball player Noah Whittinghill signed with Lindsey Wilson.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Noah-LWC-Signing-4.jpgLogan County basketball player Noah Whittinghill signed with Lindsey Wilson.

By OJ Stapleton

ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com

Lady Panthers’ Bryant signs with LWC

First Posted: 12:25 pm - May 30th, 2016

Photo submitted DavonYa Bryant signs to play basketball for Lindsey Wilson College while surrounded by her friends and teammates at Russellville High School.
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Russellville High School senior DavonYa Bryant recently signed to play basketball with Lindsey Wilson College.

Bryant led the Lady Panthers to one of their best seasons in quite some time. The Lady Panthers finished the season with a 13-13 record. The 5-foot-5 guard was second on the team in scoring (15.5 ppg) and rebounds (6.0 rpg) and led the team in 3-point percentage at 42 percent. She was also selected to the 13th Distirct All Season and All Tournament team as well as voted as the 13th District Most Outstanding Player of the Year.

“We are happy to now call DavonYa a Blue Raider! We are very excited that she chose to be apart of our basketball program here at Lindsey Wilson College.” said LWC coach Steve Beck.

“We are very proud of DavonYa and excited about her choice to continue her basketball career at Lindsey Wilson College,” said RHS coach Calvin Head. “I can’t think of anyone more deserving of this opportunity than DavonYa. She has broke the mold for our basketball program and has set the tone that hard work pays off and in due time you will be able to reap the benefits of putting in the time and effort in becoming a great player. We are definitely going to miss her leadership and her toughness that she brought to our team on a daily basis. We are all looking forward to being able to watch her play at the next level.”

Photo submitted DavonYa Bryant signs to play basketball for Lindsey Wilson College while surrounded by her friends and teammates at Russellville High School.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_RHS-signing.jpgPhoto submitted DavonYa Bryant signs to play basketball for Lindsey Wilson College while surrounded by her friends and teammates at Russellville High School.

Teachers’ pensions and their sick-day pay

First Posted: 12:16 pm - May 30th, 2016

By Jim Waters - Guest columnist



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The state teachers’ retirement-system bureaucrats and union bosses who stand guard over the commonwealth’s unsustainable public-pension gold mine want us to believe that retirement policies are too obscure and mysterious for taxpayers to enter in.

Nonsense.

Rather, their real concern is that enough taxpayers will grasp the full extent of the generosity of state retirement benefits and conclude: “we simply cannot afford such luscious pensions.”

Considering pension payments are determined in large part by salaries, such will likely be the response of many Louisville taxpayers in light of a recent survey released by the Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) showing its teachers are among the nation’s highest-paid instructors.

The JCPS salary schedule reveals that Rank One teachers with 25 years’ experience pulled in $81,887 during the 2015-16 school year, up from $80,256 in 2014-15 and $79,462 in 2013-14.

Teachers who want to use their three highest annual salaries in determining the size of their pension checks must be at least 55 years old and have taught for a minimum of 27 years.

Many teachers retire after 30 to 33 years in the classroom, allowing them to boost their pensions by including their three highest annual salaries as well as taking full advantage of a service-credit rating that climbs higher after working for three decades.

Using the aforementioned JCPS teachers’ salaries, which also reflects the type of pay – and thus level of pensions – amassed by many administrators in other areas of the commonwealth, a Rank One teacher in Louisville who retires after 33 years can expect an annual pension of $67,649, or $5,637 monthly.

I reached that retirement amount simply by multiplying the average of those three highest years of salary mentioned for JCPS’ Rank One teachers by the service credit that all Kentucky teachers get – 2.5 percent for the first 30 years and 3 percent for each additional year.

It adds up to an 84 percent service credit and a bountiful pension for a retiree who works for less than 190 days annually for 33 years, with the bounty coming from taxpayers, many of whom cannot afford their own retirement plans – or certainly not benefits as rich as Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System (KTRS) pensions – and who work many more days per year.

Add in the value of unused sick days – which is not included in that $5,637 monthly check for the JCPS Rank One retiree I mentioned earlier – and teachers’ pension checks grow like Jack’s beanstalk.

State law allows teachers to embed 30 percent of the total value of all unused sick days throughout their career – a maximum of 10 days per year and 300 per career – into the formula determining their pensions.

Applying state law, the value of each sick day is determined by taking KTRS retirees’ final annual salary – $81,887 in the case of JCPS – and divide it by 185 days, which in the case of Louisville’s veteran instructors equals $442.63. The law allows retirees to apply 30 percent of the total value of their unused sick days to determine their lifetime pensions.

If this veteran JCPS teacher accumulates 150 – or half – of the unused sick days allowed by law, she not only gets a check for $17,358 when she retires (30 percent of the value of those unused sick days minus 12.855 percent that goes into the KTRS), she also gets to apply that amount to her retirement in a way that expand the size of those pension checks for a lifetime.

In the end, our JCPS retiree’s annual pension will jump an additional $5,577 each year to more than $73,000 (not including a 1.5 percent annual cost-of-living increase) for the rest of her life just for – as the late Yogi Berra might have said – doing what she’s already paid to do.

http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_WatersHeadshot-4.jpg

By Jim Waters

Guest columnist

Jim Waters is president of the Bluegrass Institute, Kentucky’s free-market think tank. Reach him at jwaters@freedomkentucky.com. Read previously published columns at www.bipps.org.

Jim Waters is president of the Bluegrass Institute, Kentucky’s free-market think tank. Reach him at jwaters@freedomkentucky.com. Read previously published columns at www.bipps.org.

Seven, eight … nine brothers in World War II

First Posted: 12:11 pm - May 30th, 2016

By Paul G. Kengor - Guest Columnist



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Back during Memorial Day 2014, I wrote a piece on five brothers who served in World War II. I was impressed by the Bailey boys, from my neck of the woods in Western Pennsylvania, and still am. Imagine my surprise when a reader responded with a package of clippings informing me of his family, which had seven brothers in the war. Yes, seven. His name is Ted, and his parents were Stella and Walter Pietkiewicz, Polish immigrants in Pittsburgh.

I wrote up that story, thinking no family could out-do the Pietkiewicz crew. I soon learned I was wrong.

That article led to a bunch of mail composed by computers and typewriters alike. One was sent by Stanley Freedman reporting the seven sons of Fanny Greco. They lived in Providence, Rhode Island. All served in World War II.

Another came from Tina Link of Delphos, Ohio, who told me of her maternal grandmother, “Mrs. John Bohnlein,” as the attached September 1945 newspaper clip identified this selfless mother, who likewise lent seven sons to the cause.

Then followed an email from Shayne Ghere informing me of Roy and Lillie Ghere. They parented 17 children in tiny Arcola, Illinois. Seven of their boys served in World War II.

All of this prompted me to dig a bit, and I thus learned of still other cases, such as the seven Powell brothers of Hillview, Illinois.

So, there it was. The bar was set. Seven brothers in World War II must be the record, right? No.

James Yetzer of St. Mary’s, Pennsylvania threw me for a loop, letting me know that his mother gave birth to 18 children, 10 of which served their country, two of them in Korea and eight in World War II. Yes, eight brothers in World War II. James, who fought in Korea, is the last surviving member of his family.

Not to be outdone, Stan Zabka, a 91-year-old retired songwriter living in Grass Valley, California, mailed me his story. Stan is quite accomplished, with film credits to his name and even an appearance on the Johnny Carson show (click here to watch), for which he was a producer. (He has a fun memoir on his life in music, television, film, and the war.) Stan told me of the eight boys in his family that served in World War II, including himself. Of his parents’ 12 children, Stan and two brothers remain.

Alas, one of these enthusiastic correspondents told me that the Guinness Book of World Records lists the most boys from one family in the war as nine—a family from London.

But alas, the Ripkowski family would have a beef with the folks at Guinness.

One descendant of this prolific group, Robert Ripkowski, emailed to inform me of his incredible family. Stash and Mattie were hardworking Polish-Americans who settled in New Waverly, Texas, where they planted the 200-acre land and raised 16 children. Twelve of those children were boys, nine of which—yes, nine—served in World War II. And all came home.

None of the Ripkowski boys had any regrets. “We did it to serve our country,” said Mike. Franklin added: “I wish every person in America would go into the military for one year. It would make a better person out of all of them.”

What to make of all these families who contributed so many sons to this noble cause? It’s a remarkable phenomenon that hasn’t been given due attention. If you ask people about a bunch of brothers in World War II, they might know about the famous Sullivans, the tragic source of the classic film, “The Fighting Sullivans.” All five of these farmboys from Waterloo, Iowa died together when their ship was torpedoed in November 1942. (One of Stan Zabka’s seven brothers, ironically, had the task of drafting the letter informing the Sullivan parents that their five boys had been lost at sea, the very letter to which FDR affixed his signature.)

Or, modern audiences know of Steven Spielberg’s “Saving Private Ryan,” about a search led by actor Tom Hanks and team for James Ryan, whose three brothers were killed in combat.

Mercifully, none of the families I’ve discussed here lost three boys in the war. Nonetheless, their contribution was obviously significant. It is our task today to honor them. As Shayne Ghere, descendant of the 17 children (now all deceased) of Roy and Lillie Ghere of Arcola told me, “it’s now up to the grandchildren to keep up the values and legacy they left us.”

It is indeed. And we can do that first and foremost by not ruining the great country they were willing to give their lives for.

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By Paul G. Kengor

Guest Columnist

Dr. Paul Kengor is professor of political science and executive director of The Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College.

Dr. Paul Kengor is professor of political science and executive director of The Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College.

Antique Tractor Show June 2-4

First Posted: 11:35 am - May 30th, 2016

By Chris Cooper - ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com



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The 26th annual Antique Gas Engine and Tractor Association Show is this weekend beginning Thursday, June 2 through Saturday, June 4 at Auburn’s McCutchen-Coke Municipal Park.

Show times are at 8 a.m. each day. If you want to participate and bring your tractor, farm equipment or cars and trucks, all are welcome. This year’s festival will feature Minneapolis Moline tractors.

There will be South Central Mini Rod pull on Thursday, June 2 at 7 p.m.; a Remote RC Puller and Antique Tractor Show on Friday, June 3 at 6 p.m. and on Saturday, June 4 a parade at 10 a.m., children’s pull at 12 p.m., RC Pullers and Antique Tractor Show at 1 p.m. and children’s pedal at 1 p.m.

Weigh ins start one hour before the tractor pulls. There will be added money to jackpot classes. Antique tractors, engines and farm equipment are welcome. Old cars and trucks are also welcome.

The show is free. There will be food vendors there as well. For more information, call Marie England at 270-772-0367 or Drexel Johnson at 270-755-4011.

By Chris Cooper

ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

Pennyrile Electric appreciates those who sacrifice

First Posted: 11:27 am - May 30th, 2016

By Chris Cooper - ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com



Pennyrile Rural Electric Cooperative sent out postcards in the April bills asking members to send them back with a thank you note on the back to go to soldiers who serve in the Armed Forces.
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The sacrifices made by our many men and women in the Armed Forces are to be commended. It’s not an easy task to fight for freedom, and not easy to be away from home and family to do it. The Pennyrile Rural Electric Cooperative understands this sacrifice, and thus kicked off an initiative in April to make sure those serving knew it too, and knew the gratitude we Americans have for them.

Last winter the Pennyrile Board of Directors attended the National Rural Electric Association Conference and were encouraged while there, to find a way to say thank you to the active duty military personnel. It was Jim Riley of Russellville who came up with an idea that could put the Pennyrile members directly in touch with the military men and women overseas.

“Jim had an idea,” said Barney Bishop, Manager of Key Accounts at Pennyrile Electric. “He said why don’t we get some postcards, get them to our members, and encourage them to write a little thank you note on the back. Then we can get them to Fort Campbell, and from there to the soldiers.” So Pennyrile took that idea and expanded it to the school systems in their nine county territory.

Pennyrile Cooperative serves 47,000 members. It was their hopes they would get at least 10,000 cards back. They have currently receives over 5,000.

“We have had a pretty good response,” said Bishop. “We sent them out in the April bills. It’s not too late to get them back to us. We still get a few each day.”

Bishop said the Cooperative is hoping this will encourage and be very meaningful to those men and women in the service.

“You can put yourself in the shoes of a deployed service member, when your are thousands of miles away from home and then receive a letter saying thank you for your service and your freedom,” Bishop said adding, “Some of these cards have been just wonderful.”

Pennyrile Rural Electric Cooperative sent out postcards in the April bills asking members to send them back with a thank you note on the back to go to soldiers who serve in the Armed Forces.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Postcard.jpgPennyrile Rural Electric Cooperative sent out postcards in the April bills asking members to send them back with a thank you note on the back to go to soldiers who serve in the Armed Forces.

By Chris Cooper

ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

RHS holds 93rd Annual Commencement

First Posted: 11:09 am - May 30th, 2016

Photos submitted Russellville principal Kim McDaniel addresses the 2016 graduates.
The 2016 Russellville graduates attended their commencement in Jim Young Gymnasium.
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At noon on Saturday, May 21, 2016, the 93rd Annual Commencement was held for the Class of 2016, at Russellville Junior/Senior High School, Russellville, Kentucky, in the Jim Young Gymnasium.

Under the direction of Mr. Brian Brown, the Russellville J/S High School Band played the traditional “Pomp and Circumstance” for the processional of the Superintendent, Board Members, Principal, Assistant Principal, Faculty, Staff, and Graduates. After the Band performed the National Anthem and Principal, Mrs. Kimberly McDaniel, shared her welcoming remarks, guest speaker, Ms. Jessie Baker, wearing the honored white “Committ2Graduate” robe, spoke loving and encouraging comments to the class that gave her inspiration to be the “best she could be” at the beginning of her RJSHS career with this class as Freshmen.

The Commencement continued with Superintendent, Leon Smith, and Board Chairman, James C. Milam, sharing remarks, Ambassador Presentations, numerous student recognitions, the presentation of the deGraffenried Award to Nicholas Scarbrough, the presentation to Colby Nichols of the First Matt Tipton award, and the presentation of Diplomas. The Valedictory Speech was presented by Donald Stephen (Trey) Matthews, III.

Principal McDaniel presented the Graduates, Mrs. Jennifer Rogers lead the singing of RJSHS Alma Mater, and the Graduates experienced the traditional tassel moving and cap toss.

Photos submitted Russellville principal Kim McDaniel addresses the 2016 graduates.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_RHSGrad2.jpgPhotos submitted Russellville principal Kim McDaniel addresses the 2016 graduates.

The 2016 Russellville graduates attended their commencement in Jim Young Gymnasium.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_RHSgrad3.jpgThe 2016 Russellville graduates attended their commencement in Jim Young Gymnasium.

Litter abatement picks up 740 bags in April

First Posted: 11:06 am - May 30th, 2016

By Chris Cooper - ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com



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Logan County has a thriving litter abatement program responsible for picking up trash on the roads in the community. The program also tries to deters those from littering in the first place by an advertising campaign that reaches the newspaper and radio, as well as the roads themselves with signage placed to remind travelers littering is illegal.

Dwight Cockrill serves as the county’s solid waste coordinator. It is his job to oversee the program, which takes inmates out of the Logan County Detention Center and drives them throughout the week all over the county picking up trash on the side of the roads.

Cockrill releases a monthly pickup report telling how many miles and how many bags of trash were picked up in the county. His recent monthly report was for April showing over 15 roads (48.7 miles) picked up. Some of those roads included: Watermelon, Plainview, Echo Valley, Sportsman Club, Mortimer, Highland Lick, Friendship, Montgomery, Stevenson Mill, Proctor Mill, 68-80 and the Bypass.

The litter abatement crews picked up 740 bags of trash in April. Of that amount, 117 was from a dump on Ferguson Road where items picked up included: appliances, televisions, tires, linoleum flooring and a Christmas tree. The crew picked up 108 bags on the roads of Echo Valley, Friendship, Montgomery and Stevenson Mill alone.

“The litter abatement program is a very beneficial one,” said Cockrill. “It gets frustrating at times I must admit, when a crew goes out and cleans up a road only to return a week later and it’s covered in litter again. We try to advertise asking people not to throw their trash out the window, but there are some who don’t listen. We just have to keep at it in hopes that someday the littering of our community and environment will cease.”

The litter abatement program is funded though the state of Kentucky.

By Chris Cooper

ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

Lewisburg School holds graduation

First Posted: 11:01 am - May 30th, 2016

The 2016 Lewisburg Middle School graduating class.
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Lewisburg School held graduation Friday, May 20, 2016 at 6 p.m., in the school gymnasium. Seventy-six eighth grade students were recognized as graduates. Addie White was recognized as valedictorian, and Makayla Strode was recognized as salutatorian.

Three students were honored for perfect attendance for the 2015-2016 school year: Carson Bradley, Parker Bray, and Skylar McLevain. Three students were recognized for “Most Words Read” in the Reading Counts program: 1st place – Sandra Lyons (3,404,123 words), 2nd place – Bethany Borders (1,861,075 words), and 3rd place – Bailey Borders (1,835,016 words).

The following students were recognized for outstanding achievement in academics: (Language Arts) Shelby Morgan, Hayley Schweers, and Addie White; (Math) Skylar McLevain, Dalton Rosser, Xa Vaughn, and Addie White; (Science) Breann Curtis, Shelby Morgan, and Addie White; (Social Studies) Shelby Morgan, Hayley Schweers, and Addie White. The Middle School Academic Awards for Math, Science, Social Studies, and Language Arts were awarded to the Addie White, who earned the highest average in all four core classes for all three middle school years – 6th, 7th, & 8th.

Listed below are the 2015-2016 graduates of Lewisburg School:

Steven Jacob Adcock

Jillian Rose Long

Madison Brooke Ammons

Timothy Alan Lutz

Cheyenne Marie Anderson

Erica Gabrielle Lyons

Gracie May Ardrey

SandraDawn Lyons

Grisha Deepak Bhatia

Mary Adelane Mayhugh

Thomas Logan Bilyeu

Brendon Wade McKinnis

Tristan Michael Blake

Skylar Alexzander McLevain

Thomas Foster Bond

Shelby Elizabeth Morgan

Bailey Elizabeth Borders

Darin Scott Obenchain

Bethany Erin Borders

Elias David Parsons

Carson Brent Bradley

Antonio Jerry Howard Perez

Parker Thomas Bray

Hannah Faith Plummer

Adrian Jace Brown

Rhonda Michelle Reeves

Kayla Elizabeth Cable

Raven Tatianna Repsher

Kimberly Ann Cable

Leah Raeann Richmond

Hunter Ray Campbell

Charles Dawson Rogers

Gracie June Christian

Alexis Marie Rosser

Cody Dewayne Christmas

Dalton Blake Rosser

Shelby Charlize Christmas

Richard Ray Schoonover III

Charles David Christoff

Hayley Elizabeth Schweers

Jarrett Jamal Clayton

Jarrett Thomas Sears

Paloma Trinity Renea Crafton

Skylar Nicole Stewart

Rafael Antonio Cruz

Makayla Hope Strode

Christa Breann Curtis

Christopher Ethan Sweetsir

Damian Lewayne Dickerson

Lucas Dean Taylor

Madelyn Faye Dillihay

Colten Davis Teague

Alyssa Nicole Downing

Riley Nicole Thompson

Michael Clarence Drake

Abigail Mackenzie Vaughn

Tyler Everett Ezell

Xadriaunna Kay Vaughn

Gabriel Curtis Lee Forgy

Justyce Layne Warden

KayBreAna Renee Fuller

Brenton Tyler Whitaker

David Layton Garrett

Addie Marie White

James Michael Hardison

Morgan Ann McDaniel White

Caitlynn Elizabeth Hutchison

Alexis Danyel Whittemore

Paige Marie Jenkins

Abel Alexander Whittinghill

James Odell Johnson

Mackenzie Lynn Yakuboff

Tieran Jade Judd

Samuel Ryan Knight

Brayden Glen Lee

Sydney Allen Lee

The 2016 Lewisburg Middle School graduating class.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_LMSGrad.jpgThe 2016 Lewisburg Middle School graduating class.

400-Mile Yard Sale to kick off this week

First Posted: 10:54 am - May 30th, 2016

By OJ Stapleton - ostapleton@civitasmedia.com



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This year marks the 13th anniversary of the annual 400-mile yard sale that goes through Kentucky all along historic Highway 68. The sale stretches 400 miles from Sharpe Kentucky (just south of Paducah) all the way to Maysville near the Ohio border going through 60 communities including Sharpe, Aurora, Cadiz, Hopkinsville, Bowling Green, Glasgow, Edmonton, Lebanon, Wilmore, Paris, Mayslick and Maysville and all the historic small towns in between.

It brings thousands of people from around the region to the smaller towns along the route, and a lot of those do come through Logan County. The four-day sale gets under way on Thursday, June 2 and wraps up on Saturday, June 5.

The Logan County Chamber of Commerce usually receives emails and phone calls a week or two after the event from people wanting more information about Logan County, because they came through during the sale and they think it was a beautiful place.

Also there are many spaces for rent for the 400 Mile Yard Sale in a prime location right on 68/80 bypass in Auburn in front of Subway. Your trash may be someone else’s treasures. Clean out your garages, closets, attics and make some extra cash! Spaces rent for $40 for all four days of sale, first come first serve.

Rental money goes to support the Shriners Hospital for Children. Contact Jana Hanks at 270-847-2080, or stop by Hanks Construction Company at 399 East Main Street in Auburn for more information on how to rent a space.

“Reserve your space, make some extra money and support Shriners Hospital for Children,” said Hanks.

In the past few months the yard sale organizers have had requests for maps and information from 37 states plus Canada. And every year they have people come from as far away as California, Washington State, New York, Texas, Florida and even Alaska. It has become an annual event for them. There is even one couple from Japan who plan their vacation to Kentucky around the 400 Mile Sale each year.

If you want to know where all the sales are, just go to 400mile.com and click on “Yard Sale Locations” for a list of just some of the sales and what they will be selling. More sales are added every day.

You can E-mail the event organizers at sale@400mile.com and they will add your sale too. Many of the antique shops and business along the route will be offering special discounts and sidewalk sales. The 400mile.com website also has a printable map of the sale route, a list of lodging and unique dining opportunities, as well as a little bit about each of the communities you will be going through while traveling historic Hwy 68 and a section of Hwy 641. And people are also posting on Facebook at “400 Mile Sale.”

By OJ Stapleton

ostapleton@civitasmedia.com

To contact OJ, email ostapleton@civitasmedia.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact OJ, email ostapleton@civitasmedia.com or call 270-726-8394.

Tourism to produce new Logan County map

First Posted: 10:32 am - May 30th, 2016

By Chris Cooper - ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com



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Not all people use a GPS to find their way around. There are a large number of people who still utilize maps to get to where they are going. Because of this, the Logan County Tourist & Convention Commission has partnered with Town Square Publications to produce a new Logan County Map.

It has been 16 years since the last Logan County Map was produced. A lot of changes have been made in Logan County over the past decade and a half and Logan County has grown since then.

The new map will include things such as the railroad tracks and a complete bypass just to name a few.

“We have people come by our office weekly asking for Logan County maps. We are excited about the opportunity to produce a publication that will help locals and visitors alike,” said Dee Dee Brown, Office Manager of Logan County Tourism.

Logan County attracts tourist who are not familiar with the community, and the maps are located in many areas and offered for free to those who want one.

“This is yet another tool that can be used for economic development,” said Judge Executive Logan Chick. “I know that it’s hard for me to keep the maps at my office. Seems like they are always disappearing after we put them out. I think it’s a good idea to stay current. Not everyone uses technology to find where they want to go.

The Logan County Fiscal Court recently approved to spend $1,000 to help produce the new map by way of advertising in the map. If you are a business and want to advertise in the map, you can call the Logan County Tourism office at 270-726-1678 for more information.

“Some people believe that GPS have taken over and that maps are obsolete. Although it is a fact that many people have access to GPS, maps are still in demand and should be made available to the public,” said Janie Gregory, Chairman of Logan County Tourism.

Maps will be distributed to local businesses and surrounding county businesses as well. Map advertisement sales are coming to a close. Maps should be available by August 2016.

By Chris Cooper

ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact Chris Cooper, email ccooper@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

People stranded in Hidden River Cave able to exit without injury

First Posted: 9:23 am - May 30th, 2016

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The Kentucky State Police Post 3 Bowling Green received a call Thursday at approximately 2:31 p.m. from subjects that were in the Hidden River Cave in Horse Cave.

Nineteen college students from Clemson University along with four tour guides entered the cave at approx. 10 a.m. Around 2 p.m. a severe thunderstorm warning was given and a large amount of rain came that caused the water in the cave to rise. This stranded the cavers in a portion of the cave called the “The Attic”, which has a higher ceiling, where they stood by until the water rose to where they decided to attempt to make their way out of the cave.

At approximately 3 p.m. two Horse Cave Police Department officers entered the cave in an attempt to make contact with the subjects stranded when they met four individuals coming out. Emergency personnel also responded to the scene and assisted.

At approximately 4:30 p.m. all subjects had exited the cave without injury. The tour guide was able to lead them to safety.

Catfish bite heating up

First Posted: 12:20 pm - May 28th, 2016

By Kevin Kelly - Kentucky Afield



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Prized for their fight and flavor, catfish are readily available in Kentucky waters and can be caught on a wide assortment of baits.

A gob of nightcrawlers, cut bait, commercial stink bait, hot dogs, uncooked shell-on shrimp or scraps of chicken marinated in strawberry-flavored drink mix have all proven capable of enticing catfish into biting.

And late spring into early summer is a great time to cater to them.

“It’s prime time to be catching channel catfish,” said Paul Rister, Western Fisheries District biologist for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

The department stocks blue catfish and channel catfish but generally doesn’t stock flathead catfish, although the species is present in a number of lakes and rivers across the state. The annual Fishing Forecast, available on the department’s website at fw.ky.gov, details spots where anglers can find each of these species.

“Kentucky offers a ton of really good areas for catfish,” said Chad Miles, host of Kentucky Afield.

The big twins of west Kentucky – Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley – are among the finest. Both offer opportunities to catch large blue and channel catfish.

Channel catfish are distinguished by a rounded anal fin and small black spots on the sides of the body. As water temperatures climb into 70s, they feed aggressively and heed the spawning instinct.

“I’ve heard of people fishing bluegill and redear fishing who just start catching catfish and change over to a little bit heavier tackle,” Rister said.

An angler fishing from the bank after work recently at a small central Kentucky lake cast a traditional bobber rig baited with a chunk of shad-scented dough pressed onto a treble hook. The float splashed down and the business end of the rig descended with the help of a pinch of split shot. In no time, a trophy channel catfish gobbled the bait and pulled the bobber beneath the surface. Other casts produced similar results, and the angler returned to his truck before sunset with three quality catfish destined for the dinner table and freezer.

At Kentucky and Barkley lakes, Rister points anglers toward shallow embayments and areas of shoreline with rip rap or big chunk rocks for channel catfish.

A night crawler fished on the bottom with a slip sinker rig is a popular presentation. To assemble the rig, tie a 4/0 circle hook onto an 18-inch fluorocarbon or monofilament leader. Tie a barrel swivel onto the other end of the leader, then take the main line and thread it through a ½- to ¾-ounce egg sinker and plastic bead before tying the line to the other eyelet of the barrel swivel.

“Channel catfish often prefer a night crawler presentation closer to the bottom but they will take something while you’re trying to redear fish, which is typically close to the bottom, or even come up to get a crappie jig,” Rister said.

The 40 lakes that comprise the Fishing in Neighborhoods (FINs) program provide opportunities to catch catfish in a smaller setting.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife plans to stock more than 115,000 catfish in its FINs lakes this year. The stocking schedule is available on Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s website. More than two dozen FINs lakes are scheduled to receive stockings of hybrid catfish – a faster growing cross of blue and channel catfish – this month.

Populations of blue catfish have been established in several small lakes and four major reservoirs – Barren River Lake in Allen and Barren counties, Dewey Lake in Floyd County, Fishtrap Lake in Pike County and Taylorsville Lake in Spencer, Anderson and Nelson counties – in recent years.

For blue catfish at Kentucky and Barkley lakes, Rister recommends targeting the areas where creek mouths meet the river channel with nightcrawlers, skipjack or small shad, cheese baits, stink baits or chicken livers.

“Later in the summer when they get a little more active out on the main river channels, try either shad, cut bait or night crawlers,” Rister said. “A lot of times what I’ll have to do is graph some and look for the fish. If there’s not much current, they’re typically closer to the bottom. If they’re pulling some current, it seems to pull the fish more up on the ledges. So you may just be fishing more for suspended fish.”

A slip bobber rig can be an effective presentation for suspended catfish. To assemble this rig, tie a 4/0 octopus-style hook onto a 12- to 18-inch fluorocarbon or monofilament leader. Tie a barrel swivel onto the other end of the leader, then take the main line and thread it through a bobber stop, a plastic bead, the slip bobber, a sinker and another plastic bead before tying the line to the other eyelet of the barrel swivel. The sinker should not be so heavy that it sinks the bobber. Slide the bobber stop up or down to the desired fishing depth.

Anglers interested in learning more about how to catch catfish and some of the unique baits that can work for them should consider tuning in to the June 4 episode of “Kentucky Afield” on Kentucky Educational Television (KET). In one segment, Miles meets up with Jim Wise at a Shelby County farm pond. They catch catfish and other species using Wise’s homemade baits. “Kentucky Afield” airs at 8:30 p.m. Saturdays and 4:30 p.m. Sundays.

By Kevin Kelly

Kentucky Afield

Author Kevin Kelly is a staff writer for Kentucky Afield magazine, the official publication of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Get the latest from Kevin and the entire Kentucky Afield staff by following them on Twitter: @kyafield.

Author Kevin Kelly is a staff writer for Kentucky Afield magazine, the official publication of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Get the latest from Kevin and the entire Kentucky Afield staff by following them on Twitter: @kyafield.

New Logan superintendent could be named this week

Seven candidates were interviewed for position last week

First Posted: 11:42 am - May 28th, 2016

By OJ Stapleton - ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com



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The Logan County school board has completed interviewing candidates for the next superintendent.

According to former superintendent Marshall Kemp, who is serving as a consultant to the board during the hiring process, seven candidates were interviewed last week and the board is hoping to have a decision made about who will get the job by the end of the week.

“They are going to meet (Tuesday) to see where they want to go from there,” Kemp said. “The hope is that they will be able to pick one and have a new superintendent by the end of the week.”

Some 19 people expressed interest in the job with 12 actually turning in a completed application.

“The screening committee recommended as many as eight to interview from those 12 applications,” Kemp said.

The school board wound up interviewing seven over the course of last week.

Of the second, three were currently Kentucky superintendents, two were central office employees (one is local and the other is not), one high school principal and one minority superintendent candidate.

Kemp was able to sit in on all the interviews and said that it was a strong group of candidates.

“I don’t have any real vote or say about who the board will pick,” Kemp said. “I believe they have a few strong candidates to pick from. They’ve not always been pleased with every interview, but they have been pleased with some.”

The board will be selecting the replacement for Dr. Kevin Hub, who resigned after two years on the job to take the superintendent position at Scott County schools.

Hub replaced Kemp when he retired two years ago after years of leading Logan County schools.

He announced his resignation in early March.

“We didn’t get started with the hiring process until March, which makes it a little later than we would like, but since then, we have been able to stick to our schedule,” Kemp said.

Hub’s last day working for the district will be June 30.

Hub came to Logan County after serving as Assistant Superintendent and Chief Operating Officer for Madison County Schools in Richmond.

“This was a very difficult decision to make because I have really enjoyed serving the students of Logan County,” Hub said at the time of his announcement. “This is easily the most rewarding job I’ve ever had.”

Hub is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point with a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering and Environmental Geography, Eastern Kentucky University in Richmond with a Masters of Arts in Education degree in Geography Education, and Spalding University in Louisville with a Doctorate in Education in Leadership Education.

http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_LOGAN-COUNTY-SCHOOL-DISTRICT-Plain.jpg
Seven candidates were interviewed for position last week

By OJ Stapleton

ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact OJ Stapleton, email ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact OJ Stapleton, email ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

No wrongdoing by officers in shooting

Grand jury says police were ‘acting within their authority’ during deadly March shootout

First Posted: 3:02 pm - May 27th, 2016

By OJ Stapleton - ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com



File photo by Chris Cooper|NDL Logan County Coroner Mary Givens and Logan County Sheriff Department Deputies work the scene of the March 15 shooting.
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A Logan County grand jury found no wrongdoing in the shooting death of Joseph R. Harris at the hands of three police officers.

On Friday, the grand jury heard testimony from Kentucky State Police Lt. Tim Adams in the shooting of Harris and they decided that the police officers were acting within their authority when they shot and killed Harris on March 15.

The grand jury released a statement after reaching their decision.

It said, “Upon listening to the testimony of Lt. Adams and viewing all the evidence provided, we find that the officers were acting within their authority. We wish that the situation would have been resolved a different way and that the collateral damage to our community could have been minimized. We commend the officers of our community for doing a difficult job in difficult circumstances.”

Commonwealth Attorney Gail Guiling said that the decision to bring results of the investigation to a grand jury was one that she reached in conjunction with Russellville Police chief Victor Shifflet and the KSP.

“We were all on the same page,” Guiling said. “It’s not uncommon for prosecutors to make the call themselves, and I would have felt comfortable doing that, but we felt like the community might feel more confident in the results if that decision was made by the 12 citizens of the grand jury after they heard all the evidence.”

Guiling said she agreed with the decision of the grand jury.

“It was a difficult situation that was handled by the officers properly,” Guiling said. “It was not an outcome that anyone would have wished for.”

The shooting occurred on March 15 when Harris pulled into the McDonald’s parking lot around lunch time and shot his former girlfriend, Amanda Harper, 28, of Russellville, who was waiting in the drive-through line in her vehicle.

Harris then fled the scene on foot. Harper left the parking lot in her vehicle and pulled across North Main Street where she then exited the roadway and struck a building.

Harris then walked north on Main Street where he encountered responding Russellville Police Department Sergeant Morris Kisselbaugh and officers Stephen Meredith and Seth Whittaker, who had previously been having lunch at Subway when they got the call.

Upon being challenged by police, Harris brandished a firearm towards the officers, according to the KSP. At this point, all three officers fired at Harris and he was struck approximately three times. Harris was pronounced dead at the scene by the Logan County Coroner Mary Givens.

Vanna Krang, 48 of Russellville, was inside the Russellville Donut shop across from where Harris was shot. Krang was struck once in the neck by gunfire.

File photo by Chris Cooper|NDL Logan County Coroner Mary Givens and Logan County Sheriff Department Deputies work the scene of the March 15 shooting.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0370.jpgFile photo by Chris Cooper|NDL Logan County Coroner Mary Givens and Logan County Sheriff Department Deputies work the scene of the March 15 shooting.
Grand jury says police were ‘acting within their authority’ during deadly March shootout

By OJ Stapleton

ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com

To contact OJ Stapleton, email ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

To contact OJ Stapleton, email ostapleton@newsdemocratleader.com or call 270-726-8394.

Auburn recognizes graduates

First Posted: 12:45 pm - May 27th, 2016

The 2016 Auburn eighth grade class.
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Congratulations to the graduating class of 2016 and to the following students who received individual awards.

Perfect Attendance: Ashlynn Canler, Lea Knuckles, Serenity Metcalfe, Micah Page (All 9 years perfect attendance) and Korbin Scruggs

Mathematics Award: Brooke Thomas

Algebra I Award: Micah Page

Geometry Award: Sarah Cassady

Social Studies Award: Mollianne Crawford

Language Arts Award: Penelope Coles

Science Award: Jacob Orndorff

Physical Education Award: Camron Munday

Music Award: Penelope Coles

Art Award: Michaela Tackett

Tiger P.R.I.D.E. (Personal Responsibility in Developing Excellence): Trevor Hesson

Salutatorian: Sarah Cassady

Valedictorian: Micah Page

Principal’s Award: Serenity Metcalfe

2016 8th Grade Graduates include:

Tyler Quinn Alms, *^

MacKenzie Diane Anderson

Dylan Dakota Basham

Natalie Elizabeth Berry

Abbygail Haley Bradley

Olivia Elaine Brown

*Abigail Madison Canler

*^Ashlynn Dale Canler

*Bailee Sue Cardwell

*^#Sarah Katherine Cassady

*^#Penelope Hope Coles

*^#Mollianne Michelle Francine Crawford

*^Benjamin Lucas Davenport

*Marina Mercedes de la Cruz Gonzalez

Kevin Michael Derrick

Ronnie Lee Dorris

Daisy Blythe Epling

*Brooklyn Kay Fitzpatrick

Kaitlyn Anne Frazier

Christopher Wayne Gouy

Taniyah Emahje Graham

Ashton Alexander Gregory

*#Lyndsey Nicole Gregory

Bryant Dalton Haley

*^Mason Lane Haley

Jolynn Grace Hesson

Trevor Chase Hesson

*Raleigh Justus Hightower

*^#Christian Ellis Hines

*Hannah Maurie Holiman

Ethan Parker Hudson

Breanna Katherine Ingram

Halie Rae Johnson

*Lea Paige Knuckles

Hunter Barnett Lance

Lance d’Artagnan Lear

*Jason Hayden Logsdon

John Dean Luther

*Aliza Ann Markham

Gavin Kyle McDole

*Elizabeth Ann McGinnis

Aaliyah Louise McMillin

*^James Braxton Meguiar

Sean Patrick Metcalf

#Serenity Jade Metcalfe

Samantha Jeanette Miller

*^Jordan Taylor Moberly

*John Dylan Monroe

*George Xavier Monte de Oca

Sierra Storm Mosley

Camron David Jerall Munday

Morgan Taylor Newton

*Jacob Andrew Orndorff

*^#Micah Nannalee Page

*Austin Brooke Powell

Steven Leon Richadson

*^#Briley Paige Robinson

Hunter Dwight Scarbrough

Audrianna Madison Schuchart

Elizabeth Ann Scott

Korbin Wesley Scruggs

Hunter Davidson Sears

*Austin Brady Starks

*Michaela Lynn Tackett

*Amber Mae Thomas

*Brooke Leeann Thomas

Aaliyah La’Sheryl Townsend

Dakota Ray Vanderpool

Alison Mackenzie Watkins

*Parker Evan White

* Beta Club Member, ^ Honors Reading, # All A’s in 7th and 8th grade

The 2016 Auburn eighth grade class.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Auburn-Grad.jpgThe 2016 Auburn eighth grade class.

First Posted: 9:30 am - May 27th, 2016

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Paul Bernard Addison

Jackson Robert Allen

Kristy Michaela Allen

Tristan Wayne Armstrong

Abby Marie Arnold

Jacob Thomas Arnold

Larry Austin Bagby

William Douglas Bagby

Hunter Cole Bailey

Kevin Paul Bailey

Clint Andrew Baker

Kirsten Lindsey Baker

Breanna Elizabeth Baptiste

Ashton Brooke Barnes

Bailey Lou Ann Barnett

Rachel Elaine Barnett

Jacqueline Ann-Marie Belcher

Makenzie Rhea Belcher

Kirsten Leanne Binkley

Heather Leann Blake

Christian Michael Blick

Shelby Grace Blythe

Juliana Marie Bratcher

Lucas Andrew Brooks

Ethan Douglas Brown

Mary Rebecca Brown

Lauren Elizabeth Burnett

Jacob Matthew Burton

Bethany Renee Bush

Michael Dylan Byrum

Jordan Alan Campbell

Michael Dylan Cardwell

Emma Lynn Cartas

Brittany Rose-Ann Carter

Caleb Scott Cassady

Ellis Clayton Chase

John Connor Maverick Clark

Raegan Tracy Cole

Nicholas Robert Coleman

Gerry Wayne Collard

Travis Lee Collins

Luke Matthew Cook

Cassondra Leigh Cooper

Kenneth Tyronne Cornist

Autumn Rhea Costelow

Hunter Alexander Crafton

Shelby Dean Creek

Patrick Manuel Cruz

Brevin Lee Curtis

Alison Elizabeth Davis

Gregory Draper

Jessica Marie Dukes

David Jesse Duran

Johnathan Tyler Duty

Megan Michele Dye

Dalton Tyler Furlow

Ivy Sophia Galben

Tiffany Beth Gibson

Kylee Madison Gilliam

Courtney Leann Goad

Nicholas Dylan Gossett

Gatlin Austin Keith Grayson

Leah Paige Gregory

Miranda Laine Haley

Joseph Paul Hallman

Jarrett Kelly Hamilton

Stevie Wayne Hardaway

Madeline Arysa Harris

Maeson Caroline Hayes

Laura Kay Hendricks

Jordan Ryan Hendrix

Harley Anthony Charles Hess

Dustin Pete Hines

Justin Daniel Hines

Rachel Noelle Hines

Karina Louise Holloman

Korbin Rose Holloman

Chelsey Autumn Hopkins

Logan Paul Houchens

Kenton Thomas Howard

Ryan Scott Hudson

Alex Reed Hughes

Elizabeth Anne Hughes

Kayla Danielle Hunt

Maranda Diane Hurley

Abigail Jeanne Hutcheson

Sydney Marie Irvan

Sierra Cheyenne Jackson

Erin Elisabeth Jenkins

Madison Paige Jernigan

Elizabeth Gail Johnson

Hunter Sebastian Johnson

Whittney Dawn Kinnison

Skylar Dawn Kistler

Molly Anne Latham

Andrew Michael Lemons

Zachary Cole Lockhart

Christian Brittany Pearl Lynch

Lauren Elizabeth Macy

Shaun Michael Manning

Brette Danielle Markham

Taleia Lonai Mason

Easton Robert May

Courtney Dawn Mayes

Devin Kyle Mayhugh

Connor Joseph McColpin

Zachary Stephen McElfresh

Courtney Rose McGinnis

Zachary Paul McKinney

Grace Elizabeth McLellan

Sarah Frances Miller

Caitlyn Michelle Moberly

Kerri Shae Moore

Erickerson Dominique Morrow

Sierra Lynn Morrow

Aryn Nicole Murphy

Quentin Allen Nash

Blake Dakota Nealy

Griffen Jaccob Newell

Keaton Wesley Oberhausen

Triston Nicholas Oberhausen

Aurora Polet Ochoa

Jonathan Rhett Oliver

William Bradley Oliver

Robert Ryan Orndorff

Taylor Jordan Owens

Keechera Lynn Palacios

Marah Leigh Shae Parker

Bryson Lewis Peters

Ashley Ann Pitts

Torrie Lea Pollard

Daniel Braden Poore

Desirae Lynnette Powell

Kendra Marie Proctor

Kimberly Lee Ann Proctor

Saraha Rose Ramsey

Andrea Faith Raymer

Ethan Ray Reinitz

James Michael Riley

William Carr Robey

Payton Michelle Rogers

Garrison Lee Rosser

Tessa Kathleen Rowlands

Nicholas Andrew Sandlin

Russell Lee Sayne

Seth Edward Schweers

Cameron Osborne Scott

Gavin Michael Scruggs

Sedale De Kwan Shannon

Maggie Samantha Sharpe

Timothy Richard Siens

Kristen Renee Skipworth

Bobby Wayne Snoddy

John Noah Stahl

Benjamin Austin Stamps

Chanler Grace Steenbergen

Sarah Anne-nichole Sterling

Kaitlyn Nichole Storms

Julianna Nichole Stratton

Steven Vincent Stup

Jessica Marie Styn

Peyton Nicole Taylor

Kaleb Wayne Thomason

Dayton Jamal Thompson

Jeramie Shayne Thompson

Madison Payton Thornberry

Matthew Christian Tinsley

Sarah Jordan Tinsley

Justin Mark Venable

Billy Ray Vick

Kellie Victoria Warden

Virginia Michelle Watkins

Virginia Leann Watson

Coit Mason Riley Whitmon

Noah Matthew Whittinghill

Brittany Lane Wilhelm

Cody Dewayne Wilson

Johna Brooklyn Renee Winters

Brianna Dawn Wooden

Adam Joseph Wright

Nathan Michael Wright

Quintin Owen Wright

Richard Davonte’ Wajibu Wynn

Not Pictured

Jeremy Allen Anderson

Dakota Battcher

Kira Grace Binkley

Talazia Leon’a Boards

Taylor Nicole Borders

Matthew Aaron Brock

Brandi Reign Brown

Brandon Clay Brown

Jonathan Avery Brown

Melissa Ann Brown

Madison Grace Bruner

Tristan Taylor Burton

Robert Zachary Caudill

Dalyn Wythe Chapman

Skylar Dawn Ray-Anna Covington

Ashley Danylle Dancer

Claire Marie Dancer

Ericka Jean Dearing

Trevor Allen DeBerry

Christopher Jordan Dunn

Kristopher Scott Ellis

Breanna Renea Ferguson

Meagan Lee Ferguson

Kaitlynne Mckenzie Fisher

Sydney Brooke Fisher

Holly Caroline Foster

Jessica Ann Freeman

Jordan Nichole Goss

Joanna Marie Hall

Charles Wesley Henderson

Katlyn Sierra Hendricks

Tyra Symon Hubbard

Hannah Ann Hudson

Morgan Elizabeth Hunt

Taylor Danielle Hunt

Sydney Lee Hurt

Kayla Mae Hust

Ashton Cierra Johnson

Dakota Shelby Johnson

Jackie Desha Johnson

Makayla Leigh Johnson

Samariah Margaret Gail Knight

Dylan Wade Knuckles

David Ryan Krinock

Andrew Thomas Lauterbach

Micah Andrew Lindsey

Trent Phillip Locke

Nicholas Chyle Manning

Kirsten Ann Matthews

Charley Breanna Maxwell

Andrew Justin Lane Norris

Kayla-Shae Arnell Pfistner

David Lee Porter

John Terrell Rager

Beahlie Breanna Richmond

Cheyanna Kaylan Roberts

Kaitlyn Elizabeth Roberts

Katie Lee Robertson

Sebastian Neal Rolett

Joshua Ryan Thomas Ross

Alec Daniel Russell

Taylor Rachelle Schultz

Brittany Dawn Sharp

Zoey Anne-marie Shockley

Jenna Kaye Simmons

Robert Daniel Stevens

Addison Savannah Stewart

Olivia Love Stratton

Auburn Lee Todd

Elizabeth Kate Vanzee

Kyle Dean Vaughn

Miranda Kaye Walls

Audrey June Wells

Justin Allen Welsh

Brianna Gayle Winn

Austin Tyler Ray Yewell

Cougars win district

First Posted: 9:29 am - May 27th, 2016

By Kelly Phillips - kellyphillips@civitasmedia.com



Photos by Kelly Phillips | NDL Logan County shortstop Austin Rayno charges a bouncer in the opening game of the 13th District tournament in Todd County. The Cougars beat the Rebels 12-1 on Monday.
Cougar left fielder Nick Wooden slides safely into second base during a district tournament game on Monday. Logan County beat the Rebels 12-1.
Freshman Dylan Penick smashed a 2-run home run against Todd County on Monday. The Cougars won the District championship after beating the Rebels and Franklin-Simpson in Elkton.
The 13th District champion Cougars celebrate after a win at Todd County Central High School. Logan County beat Todd County 12-1, then defeated Franklin-Simpson 4-3 to take the title.
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The 2016 baseball Cougars are the 13th district champions. Logan County clashed with the Wildcats from Franklin-Simpson on Tuesday night in Elkton for the title. The final score was 4-3.

The district tournament kicked off on Monday for Logan County, Russellville, Franklin-Simpson, and hosts Todd County Central.

The Cougars took on the Todd County Central Rebels in the opening contest. Things did not go well from the start for the (3-25) Rebels. Austin Rayno, the lead-off batter for Logan, was hit by a pitch. The Todd County pitcher walked the following two hitters. The Cougars took advantage of the situation by putting up six runs in the 1st inning.

The Offensive onslaught continued throughout the remainder of the game. Dylan Penick went deep in the bottom of the 4th. The two run shot was Penick’s first homer of the season. Logan County destroyed Todd County 12-1 in five innings.

Austin Rayno, Nick Wooden, and Dylan Penick had two hits each. Nick Wooden led the pack with three RBIs.

Senior Jordan Hendrix went the distance for Logan County. His nine strikeouts dominated the Rebel lineup. Todd County only managed two hits.

The opening win set up a championship meeting with the Franklin-Simpson Wildcats on Tuesday night. The (19-16) Cats beat the Cougars at Logan County High School on May 3.

Franklin took advantage of an early 1st inning error to jump ahead 1-0. The score would not change until the bottom of the 3rd. Bradley Taylor made up for the defensive error by hitting an RBI double down the first base line. The two teams remained knotted at one run each until the last of the 5th. Koby Wall doubled to lead off the inning. Michael Riley smacked a single up the middle. Wall scored on the throw to the plate making the score 2-1.

The Cougars would not stop there. With two outs in the bottom of the 6th inning, Austin Rayno doubled in two more runs. Logan County had a little breathing room at 4-1 going into the final frame. Franklin-Simpson would not make things easy on Ethan Smock and the Cougars.

The 7th inning started out with a quick ground out to Dylan Penick. The Wildcats had runners at first and second after a walk and hit by pitch. The Franklin catcher, Jacob Curtis, hit a single to right field, making it 4-2. The next batter smashed a double to the fence in right center field. One run scored on the hit, but the tying run was gunned down at the plate. With two outs and the tying run on third for Franklin, Smock got the batter to ground out to Bradley Taylor to end the game 4-3.

The Cougars pounded out ten hits in the championship win. Franklin-Simpson had six. Michael Riley hit three singles. Austin Rayno and Bradley Taylor had two hits, including a double each. Dylan Penick, D.J. Beard, and Koby Wall had one hit a piece.

Ethan Smock turned in a solid winning effort on the steep hill at Rebel field. Smock retired five Wildcats on strikeouts, walked two, and only allowed two earned runs.

Logan County (28-8) will now gear up for the 4th Region baseball tournament which starts Monday at Western Kentucky University.

Photos by Kelly Phillips | NDL Logan County shortstop Austin Rayno charges a bouncer in the opening game of the 13th District tournament in Todd County. The Cougars beat the Rebels 12-1 on Monday.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_paper01-3.jpgPhotos by Kelly Phillips | NDL Logan County shortstop Austin Rayno charges a bouncer in the opening game of the 13th District tournament in Todd County. The Cougars beat the Rebels 12-1 on Monday.

Cougar left fielder Nick Wooden slides safely into second base during a district tournament game on Monday. Logan County beat the Rebels 12-1.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_paper02-4.jpgCougar left fielder Nick Wooden slides safely into second base during a district tournament game on Monday. Logan County beat the Rebels 12-1.

Freshman Dylan Penick smashed a 2-run home run against Todd County on Monday. The Cougars won the District championship after beating the Rebels and Franklin-Simpson in Elkton.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_paper03-4.jpgFreshman Dylan Penick smashed a 2-run home run against Todd County on Monday. The Cougars won the District championship after beating the Rebels and Franklin-Simpson in Elkton.

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The 13th District champion Cougars celebrate after a win at Todd County Central High School. Logan County beat Todd County 12-1, then defeated Franklin-Simpson 4-3 to take the title.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_paper05-4.jpgThe 13th District champion Cougars celebrate after a win at Todd County Central High School. Logan County beat Todd County 12-1, then defeated Franklin-Simpson 4-3 to take the title.

By Kelly Phillips

kellyphillips@civitasmedia.com

Panthers end season with loss to FS

First Posted: 11:18 pm - May 26th, 2016

By Kelly Phillips - kellyphillips@civitasmedia.com



Photos by Kelly Phillips | NDL Russellville Senior George Ortiz swings against Franklin in the district tournament at Todd County. The Panthers fell 5-1.
Panther third baseman TK Hampton makes a leaping attempt for a pop foul against the Wildcats. FS beat Russellville 5-1.
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The Russellville Panthers came to the 13th District tournament as the number three seed for 2016. They drew a tough match up with defending champion Franklin-Simpson for the opening round. The second inning that the Wildcats put together proved to be too much for the Panthers. Russellville fell 5-1.

Franklin-Simpson racked up five runs in the 2nd inning. Russellville broke up the shutout in the top of the fifth with a Jesus Zamarripa double to center field. George Ortiz scored the lone Panther run.

The Wildcat pitching only allowed Russlleville four hits in the game. Jordan Blick and Dillon Porter had a single apiece. Zamarripa had a double and a single. Franklin’s Seth Johnson threw a complete game for the win and struck out 17 Panthers.

Colby Nichols and Jordan Blick split the pitching duties for Russellville. Nichols went 1.2 innings, allowing only two hits and one earned run. Blick also only allowed two hits, while striking out five.

The Panthers finish the 2016 season with a record of (10-17.)

Photos by Kelly Phillips | NDL Russellville Senior George Ortiz swings against Franklin in the district tournament at Todd County. The Panthers fell 5-1.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_rhs-baseball01.jpgPhotos by Kelly Phillips | NDL Russellville Senior George Ortiz swings against Franklin in the district tournament at Todd County. The Panthers fell 5-1.

Panther third baseman TK Hampton makes a leaping attempt for a pop foul against the Wildcats. FS beat Russellville 5-1.
http://newsdemocratleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_rhs-baseball02.jpgPanther third baseman TK Hampton makes a leaping attempt for a pop foul against the Wildcats. FS beat Russellville 5-1.

By Kelly Phillips

kellyphillips@civitasmedia.com

Beware of phone scammers

First Posted: 4:04 pm - May 26th, 2016

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The Russellville Police Department are continuing to get complaints of phone scams in which callers are promising large sums of money in the forms of checks or to be placed in their accounts if they follow a few instructions. The callers sometimes pretend to be government agencies advising that you are owed money or that they have grant money for you. Be aware of these scams and do not give out any personal information. The callers also will ask on occasion for you to use prepaid cards to send them money in order for you to receive your money.

The phone numbers that these scammers use vary, but can sometimes show as local numbers being that they are computer generated and not where the actual caller is located, making the scammer difficult to track. Ignoring the calls and blocking them will help, where as the more interest an individual shows in the acclaimed money will make the scammer more likely to continue calling.

Please pay attention to who calls you. Never give out personal information over the phone. Don’t give your address, bank information, social security number, birthday, etc. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

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Not satisfied with water ratesDear Editor,

First Posted: 3:29 pm - May 26th, 2016

Shirlee Yassney - Russellville



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I began my political career by speaking out for the citizens of Russellville in what you and other media, and also the state authorities, called a “Water Crisis.” I was elected Mayor of Russellville in 1998 and re-elected four years later because of my willingness to identify the problems with our water supply in Russellville and to work hard to find solutions that gave us safe drinking water. This was not an easy task, and like other worthwhile projects the City Council and I worked on during that time, it was and is an ongoing task. Unfortunately, one of the first steps in cleaning up our water supply was to find the money to do it. The state provided much needed grant money, but we also had to raise our water rates to cover years of past neglect.

I am certainly not seeking public office at this time of my life, but I am once again speaking out for the citizens of Russellville. Our family, like many others, struggle to understand why almost 20 years after the “water crisis” and the expenses of correcting it, we continue to have such terribly high water bills. A couple of months ago, after so many people complaining to me about this issue, I asked to see the city’s financial statements to see if I could find anything that could be done to help decrease our water/sewer bills. What I found was AMAZING! I found the city has a surplus of a quarter million dollars on their P&L (Profit/Loss) statement and several million in the bank with no FDIC! I noted several areas that were questionable, visited the Mayor to ask for answers, and gave him suggestions. I left feeling confident that he would do as he promised and look into the matter to find a fair solution for the citizens of Russellville.

After hearing nothing from the Mayor’s office for a month, I’ve received a letter from the city attorney explaining their position.

Just before I left office in 2006, we had a water rate study done. (By the way, this apparently was the last study done.) The study suggested a 5.7% increase. I presented this to the Council and asked for a vote. Councilman Zick made a motion to increase water rates by 55%. Yes, that’s 55%, and as I gaped, the motion passed. Before I could do anything to keep it from becoming law, my term was up. When newly elected Mayor Zick took office after that, I went to a City Council meeting, once again as a citizen of Russellville, to protest this outrageously unnecessary rate increase. I was told by Mayor Zick to sit down and shut up. So I did… until now. Too many people have asked me to speak out for them.

Even though our Mayor and City Council have done nothing wrong or illegal, they do have the power to do the RIGHT thing. They have collected a huge surplus of funds from us

over the last ten years, a quarter of a million dollars! The Mayor calls this their “rainy day fund.” Well, we citizens of Russellville think we’ve been rained on long enough! They have the power to decrease all our water bills, including the little old lady who contacted me, who “takes a spit bath every day to keep from using too much water and uses the dirty water to water her flowers.”(her words)

These are suggestions I have for the Russellville City Council in regard to our current “Water Crisis:”

Commission a new water rate study. This is essential to bringing the rates where they need to be. The Russellville City Council should not be comfortable with a surplus of a quarter million dollars on their P&L (Profit/Loss) statement and several million in the bank with no FDIC!

Address the water you are losing (probably from the old water reservoir). 40-45% of all water we buy from Logan/Todd water is going into the ground… zip… gone. $40-50 thousand a month… over half million a year! That would buy a couple of NEW reservoirs????

Create a watchdog group for all our public utilities, something like a “Citizens Advisory Board for Public Utilities,” so this will not happen again.

This a serious matter and it seems some accountability needs to be in place. Coming from a large family, I know you love all of them and they upset you now and then, but you forgive and keep loving them. That’s how I feel about

everyone I know in Russellville, including the Mayor and City Council Members. I love and pray for you and your families, but I love and support the water/sewer rate payers in this city, also. We are praying you will do the RIGHT thing.

Shirlee Yassney

Russellville